Selecting a Stallion for your Breeding Program

 

Richard stands with Kaolino, Michelle Morgan and Denise Gault at MHF

Richard stands with Kaolino, Michelle Morgan and Denise Gault at MHF

Horsereporter talks with Richard Lancaster about the stallions at Stud for Shadwell and the importance of the selection of stallions for breeding.

Richard Lancaster has worked for Shadwell since 1985. In his capacity as Stud Manager, he oversees the entire Shadwell operation, coordinating activities at the public and private studs. He also is Chairman of the UK’s Thoroughbred Breeding Association (TBA) and Trustee of the British European Breeders’ Fund.

Shadwell Arabian Stallions at Stud have all been Grade 1 winners in top races in Europe and the Middle East. Let’s explore why Shadwell chose these prime stallions for their Stud Program and where they are located.

Q.What was the criteria to select the stallions listed to be Shadwell Studs?

Richard: All these stallions performed at the highest level.  They were proven racehorses who, just as importantly, proved themselves to be sound on the track as you will see from the number of times they ran. 

The final consideration was that they all have well recognised traditional pedigrees, mainly from French lines. 

In the opinion of the famous Thoroughbred stallion master in Kentucky, Bull Hancock of Spendthrift Farm, a stallion had to have pedigree, conformation, and to have performed at the highest level.    

Q. Why did Shadwell choose particular stallions for each region/area? 

Richard: We have tried to repay the French breeders from whom a large number of these horses were bought.  We have placed stallions in those areas of France where the Arabian horse is traditionally bred. We do try to move them around after two years, so as to give breeders a chance to use different horses.

In the case of Kaolino, we decided that, as there were a number of stallions already standing in France by Dormane, it was sensible to send him to the U.S.  He had the form on the dirt in the UAE and he had shown plenty of speed. We felt he would provide an interesting outcross.

Q. Artificial Insemination and the ability to send frozen semen to any location in the world is a bonus to Arabian horse owners worldwide who wish to breed to top stallions. Is this a large part of your breeding operation? 

Richard: Artificial insemination does provide breeders with the opportunity to use top stallions from around the world. Madjani and No Risk Al Maury been very popular, both in the Middle East and the U.S. 

Q. It has been said that in order to have a competitive race horse, you should breed to the best you can find that matches your breeding program. How should an owner/breeder decide exactly which horse to breed to his mares? 

Richard: Breeding is a game of chance. If you take the Thoroughbred example, for every ten horses that retire to stud, one or two will become successful stallions. The same would be true of the Arabian. You therefore have to go back to the Bull Hancock selection criteria and look at performance, conformation and pedigree for your stallion, and then see which suits your mares. There are a large group of stallions around, but inevitably people are being drawn to a couple of individuals whose produce have dominated recently. This does not maintain a strong and varied gene pool. 

Q. Any new stallions coming into the breeding lines this year?

Richard: We will not be retiring anything this season, so no new stallion for 2014.

Q.What else do you want the public to know about these stallions and how easy it is to get a breeding?

Breeding Arabians is a long drawn out business; from covering to getting on the track.  We believe we have an excellent group of stallions who are just starting to have runners. The young stock look exciting, so I am sure there will be good runners to come. 

We are only too delighted to help any breeder who wishes to use our stallions.  They can either contact the individual farms where the horses are standing or the office at Shadwell. Obviously, in the U.S. our agent Dennie Gault will answer any questions.

 In the next edition on Stallion Selection, we’ll talk to Denise Gault about shaping a breeding program, how to find the correct stallion for your breeding goals, and the facts about Artificial Insemination (AI).

Shadwell Arabian Stallions and Stud location

No Risk Al Maury (Kesberoy x Nectarine Al Maury by Baroud III) Premier racing bloodlines. Leading Arabian Racehorse in Europe and Middle East with rating of 128 in 2011.

25 Races, 17 wins and 7 places

Stands at Haras de l’Abbaye, France  (Central France, near Limoges)

Madjani (Tidjani x Salama by Sibawaih) Horse of the year in 2005, 2006, and 2007.

17 Races (3x Kahayla Classic Gr 1 , 2x HH The President Cup Gr1), 13 wins and 3 second places.

Stands at Haras de Saint-Faust, France (Southwest France)

Al Saoudi (Nuits St Georges x Fatzica by Fatzour)

11 Races, 5 wins (Prix du President des Emirats Arabis Unis Gr 1) and 4 places

Stands at Haras de Saint-Faust, France

Monsieur Al Maury (Djelfor x Melusine Al Maury by Bakara)

7 Races, 3 wins, 2 places

Sire of Bengali d’Albret

Stands at Melton Paddocks, UK (near Thetford in Norfolk, England)

Kaolino (Dormane x Cary De Carrère by Passem)

18 Races, 9 wins (Dubai Kahayla Classic Gr 1), 7 second place

Sire of Smoke House, Darley 3 yr old colt

Stands at Mandolynn Hill Farm, Aubrey, Texas, USA

Chndaka ( Dormane x Malika Fontenay)

29 Races, 8 wins, 19 places

Stands at Mandolynn Hill Farm, Aubrey, Texas, USA

Nivour De Cardonne (Manganate x Pistache De Cassou by Baroud III)

17 Races, 4 Stakes wins (Dubai Kahayla Classic G1), 7 stakes places

Stands at Mandolynn Hill Farm, Aubrey, Texas, USA

Al Jakbar (Al Sakbe x Essaada by Hosni)

7 Races, 2 wins, 3 places.

Stands at Melton Paddocks, UK

Al Sakbe (Kesberoy x Morgane De Piboul)

18 Races, 11 wins, 7 places

Stands at Melton Paddocks, UK

Jiyush (Manganate x Ester du Paon by Cheri Bibi)

25 Races, 8 wins and 13 places

Stands at Melton Paddocks, UK

~END

 

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